Tinsel Embroidery

  • Tinsel embroidery is particularly done on the net, tulle and thin muslin materials. It is quite an imitation of the Turkish embroideries with gold thread upon crepe. The patterns are mostly drawn in outline and do include geometrical designs that need to be simple as well as with lines rather wide apart.
  • In order to begin with Tinsel embroidery, you have to trace the design upon pink calico that backs with brown paper and upon this tack the net. You have to take the narrowest tinsel, thread it on to a wool needle as well as work it backwards and forwards along the outlines. By putting it below a line, you have to bring it out above it in a slanting direction to the right and then slant it again. However, you need to put it below the lines well as press it down with the thumb so that it rather overlays itself as well as form the line as complete series of Vandyke Stiches. Moreover, work in floss silk and in satin stitch like parts of the pattern are quite small for the tinsel lines.
  • Tinsel is quite widely used instead of gold thread in embroideries upon velvet, brocade and silk but when it soon tarnishes, the latter is quite the best in order to employ for good work.
  • Metallic threads as well as cords in gold, silver and copper and varied tinsel effects were quite often used in artistic needle-work in the late 1880’s or early 1990’s. They were quite sometimes employed in a separate manner, but more frequently, they were associated with silk, chenille and crewel.
  • A term that is used for signifying a thin as well as loosely-woven material that is formed partly or entirely of gold as well as silver threads and introduced into embroidery is tinsel fabric. The very dress of harlequin was composed entirely of tinsel. There exist some allusions to this bright as well as sparkling material in some of the classical authors. Tinsel can be purchased in thin sheets for application to net, gauze and velvet or for wrappers of bonbons and crackers.
  • Tinsel embroidery is one of the most sought after embroidery throughout the world.